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At least since John L. Sullivan, in the late 19th century, there have been world boxing champions. The first of today's organizations to award a world title was the World Boxing Association, known as the National Boxing Association when it sanctioned its first title fight in 1921 between Jack Dempsey and Georges Carpentier for the heavyweight championship.

There are now four major sanctioning bodies in professional boxing. The official rules and regulations of the World Boxing Association,[1] World Boxing Council,[2] International Boxing Federation[3] and World Boxing Organization[4] all recognize the other three major sanctioning bodies in their rankings and title unification rules. Each of these organizations sanction and regulate championship bouts and award championships. American boxing magazine The Ring began awarding world championship belts in 1922.

There are seventeen weight divisions. To compete in a weight class, a boxer's weight must not exceed the upper limit. Manny Pacquiao has won world championships in eight different weight classes, more than any other boxer. The Klitschko brothers, Vitali and Wladimir, hold all five major titles in the heavyweight division. They are the first brothers to hold versions of the heavyweight championship at the same time.[5]

Championships Edit

When a champion, for reasons beyond his control such as an illness or injury, is unable to defend his title within the normal mandatory time, the sanctioning bodies may order an interim title bout and award the winner an interim championship. The WBA and WBC may change the status of their inactive champions to Champion in Recess.

World Boxing Association Edit

The World Boxing Association (WBA) was founded in 1921 as the National Boxing Association (NBA)—a national regulating body of the United States. On August 23, 1962, the NBA became the WBA, which today has its head office in Panama.[6] According to WBA championship rules, when a champion holds a title of one of the other three major sanctioning bodies in an equivalent weight class, the boxer is granted special recognition: he is called the unified champion and is given more time between mandatory title defences. The WBA Championships Committee and President may designate a champion as a Super Champion in exceptional circumstances.[1] The WBA title is vacated if it is one of the titles the respective boxer holds. When a WBA champion makes between five and ten successful defences, he may be granted the WBA "Super" title upon discretion of a vote of the WBA's board of governors.[7]

World Boxing Council Edit

The World Boxing Council (WBC) was founded in Mexico City, Mexico on February 14, 1963 in order to establish an international regulating body.[8] The WBC established many of today's safety measures in boxing, such as the standing eight-count,[9] a limit of 12 rounds instead of 15, and additional weight classes. To read about the WBC's Diamond and Emeritus Champions, please see the separate article about the WBC.

International Boxing Federation Edit

The International Boxing Federation (IBF) originated in September 1976 as the United States Boxing Association (USBA) when American members of the WBA withdrew in order to legitimize boxing in the United States with "unbiased" ratings.[10] In April 1983, the organization established an international division that was known as the United States Boxing Association-International (USBA-I).[10] In May 1984, the New Jersey-based USBA-I was renamed and became the IBF.[10]

World Boxing Organization Edit

The World Boxing Organization (WBO) was founded in San Juan, Puerto Rico (which is a self-governing commonwealth of the United States) in 1988. Its motto is "dignity, democracy, honesty."[11] When a WBO champion has reached "preeminent status" the WBO's Executive Committee may designate him as a "Super Champion".[12] Besides the beltholders that are called "Super Champion", there are other fighters that have been named "WBO Super Champion" like Bernard Hopkins, Joe Calzaghe, Kelly Pavlik, Óscar De La Hoya, Manny Pacquiao, Juan Díaz, Marco Antonio Barrera, Fernando Montiel, Jorge Arce, Iván Calderón. The WBO championships are not universally recognized. Some media sites do not include the WBO in their list of champions,[13][14] but others do.[15][16] On December 8, 2012, Juan Manuel Márquez has been named "Fighter of the Decade" by the WBO and was awarded a special belt when beating Manny Pacquiao by KO within six rounds.

The Ring Edit

The Ring is a respected boxing magazine that was founded in 1922, upon which it first began awarding world championship belts. It maintains its own version of lineal championships in each weight class. Title belts ceased to be awarded in the 1990s, but the practice was resumed in 2002.[17] From 2002 onwards, a championship system was created with the intention to "reward fighters who, by satisfying rigid criteria, can justify a claim as the true and only world champion in a given weight class."[17] The Ring claims to be more authoritative and open than that of the sanctioning bodies with regards to rankings, with a page devoted to full explanations for ranking changes. A fighter pays no sanctioning fees to defend or fight for the title at stake, contrary to practices of the sanctioning bodies. There are currently three ways that a fighter can win The Ring's title:

  • Defeat the reigning champion
  • Win a bout between The Ring's #1 and #2 contenders
  • If the #1 and #2 contenders chose not to fight each other, if either of them fights the #3, #4 or #5 contender, the winner may be awarded The Ring title belt if the Editorial Board deems the contenders worthy.[18]

Current champions Edit

The current champions in each weight class are listed below as of November 16, 2018.

Heavyweight (200+ lb, 90.7+ kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
Anthony Joshua Deontay Wilder Anthony Joshua Anthony Joshua Vacant

Cruiserweight, Junior heavyweight (200 lb, 90.7 kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
Oleksandr Usyk Oleksandr Usyk Oleksandr Usyk Oleksandr Usyk Oleksandr Usyk

Light heavyweight (175 lb, 79.4 kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
Dmitry Bivol Adonis Stevenson Artur Beterbiev Eleider Alvarez Vacant

Super middleweight (168 lb, 76.2 kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
George Groves David Benavidez Jose Uzcategui Gilberto Ramirez Vacant

Middleweight (160 lb, 72.6 kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
Canelo Álvarez Canelo Álvarez Vacant Vacant Vacant

Super welterweight, Junior middleweight (154 lb, 69.9 kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
Jarrett Hurd Jermell Charlo Jarrett Hurd Jaime Munguia Vacant

Welterweight (147 lb, 66.7 kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
Keith Thurman Shawn Porter Errol Spence Jr. Terence Crawford Vacant

Super lightweight, Junior welterweight (140 lb, 63.5 kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
Kiryl Relikh Jose Ramirez Vacant Maurice Hooker Vacant

Lightweight (135 lb, 61.2 kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
Vasiliy Lomachenko Mikey Garcia Mikey Garcia Jose Pedraza Vasiliy Lomachenko

Super featherweight, Junior lightweight (130 lb, 59 kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
Gervonta Davis Miguel Berchelt Tevin Farmer Masayuki Ito Vacant

Featherweight (126 lb, 57.2 kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
Leo Santa Cruz Gary Russell Jr. Josh Warrington Oscar Valdez Vacant

Super bantamweight, Junior featherweight (122 lb, 55.3 kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
Daniel Roman Rey Vargas TJ Doheny Isaac Dogboe Vacant

Bantamweight (118 lb, 53.5 kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
Ryan Burnett Vacant Emmanuel Rodriguez Zolani Tete Vacant

Super flyweight, Junior bantamweight (115 lb, 52.2 kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
Khalid Yafai Srisaket Sor Rungvisai Jerwin Ancajas Vacant Srisaket Sor Rungvisai

Flyweight (112 lb, 50.8 kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
Artem Dalakian Cristofer Rosales Moruti Mthalane Sho Kimura Vacant

Light flyweight, Junior flyweight (108 lb, 49 kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
Hekkie Budler Ken Shiro Vacant Angel Acosta Hekkie Budler

Minimumweight, Strawweight, Mini flyweight (105 lb, 47.6 kg)Edit

WBA WBC IBF WBO The Ring
Knockout CP Freshmart Wanheng Menayothin Vacant Vic Saludar Vacant

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Specific
  1. 1.0 1.1 "Rules of World Boxing Association" (PDF). World Boxing Association. http://wbanews.com/artman/uploads/1/WBARulesADOPTEDPUNTACANA2008.pdf. Retrieved March 2, 2009.
  2. "World Boxing Council Rules and Regulations" (PDF). World Boxing Council. http://www.wbcboxing.com/downloads/NEW_RULES_AND_REGULATIONS_WEB_FINAL_2009.pdf. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  3. "IBF/USBA RULES GOVERNING CHAMPIONSHIP CONTESTS" (PDF). International Boxing Federation. http://www.ibf-usba-boxing.com/userfiles/File/RulesGoverningChampionshipContestsEffectiveSeptember1_2006with10_21_10amendments.pdf. Retrieved January 18, 2011.
  4. "World Boxing Organization Regulations of World Championship Contests". World Boxing Organization. http://www.wboboxing.com/regulations/. Retrieved March 2, 2009.
  5. Lewis, Ron (October 13, 2008). "Vitali Klitschko impressive in comeback victory". The Times. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/more_sport/boxing/article4931508.ece. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  6. "World Boxing Association History". World Boxing Association. http://wbanews.com/artman/publish/wbahistory/index.shtml. Retrieved March 2, 2009.
  7. "World Boxing Association Super Belt winners". World Boxing Association. http://wbanews.com/artman/publish/campionshipSuperBeltWinners/index.shtml. Retrieved March 2, 2009.
  8. "World Boxing Council". World Boxing Council. http://www.wbcboxing.com/indexEng.php. Retrieved September 5, 2009.
  9. "Rules that have changed the History of Boxing". World Boxing Council. Archived from the original on September 25, 2007. http://web.archive.org/web/20070925051631/www.wbcboxing.com/WBCboxing/Portal/cfpages/contentmgr.cfm?docId=123&docTipo=4&orderby=docid&sortby=ASC. Retrieved June 6, 2006.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 "History of the IBF". International Boxing Federation. December 4, 2000. Archived from the original on December 4, 2000. http://web.archive.org/web/20001204194900/http://ibf-usba-boxing.com/history.html. Retrieved June 6, 2006.
  11. "WBO logo". World Boxing Organization. http://www.wboboxing.com/. Retrieved November 6, 2011.
  12. "WBO Regulations of World Championship Contests" (PDF). World Boxing Organization. Section 14. http://www.wboboxing.com/regulations/.
  13. "Current Boxing Champions' Career Records". Sports Illustrated. March 22, 1998. http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/more/boxing/stats/champs.html. Retrieved December 11, 2010.
  14. "Current Boxing Champions". Yahoo!. December 11, 2010. http://sports.yahoo.com/box/news?slug=champs. Retrieved December 11, 2010.
  15. "Reigning Champions". ESPN Internet Ventures. January 20, 2011. http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/boxing/news/story?page=boxing/champions/index. Retrieved January 20, 2011.
  16. "List of Champions". BBC Sport. May 5, 2007. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/boxing/champions_list/default.stm. Retrieved May 7, 2007.
  17. 17.0 17.1 "About The Ring". The Ring. February 14, 2009. http://www.ringtv.com/about/. Retrieved February 8, 2009.
  18. Kellerman, Max (January 22, 2004). "Gatti vs. the unknown". ESPN. http://static.espn.go.com/boxing/columns/kellerman_max/1715320.html. Retrieved March 3, 2009.
General

External links Edit